The problems with National and A.C.T. employment policies: PART 3


In Part 2 of my series on the problems I have with National and A.C.T.’s employment policies, I focussed on workplace accidents and support for those who are fatigued or stressed. In this third and final part, I examine issues that employers face in hiring staff and the problem of rife discrimination in the work place.

On a regular basis in the news we hear from employers who are unable to find the appropriate staff to work for them. An ongoing problem, it is one that stems from a number of surprisingly obvious decisions that economic planners have made over the years, which we are now reaping the consequences of. One, and perhaps the most obvious has been the failure of employers to do due diligence on recruitment, by not making sure that new employees have the necessary qualifications to do the job. I remember that at work on a couple of instances several years ago, temps were being used to help regular staff keep pace with the summer time workload; the vast majority were alright and lasted either until they moved on or we did need them any longer. However there was the odd temp that did not last their first shift. One or two did not have full driver licences, and were thus not legally able to drive cars; others lied to their recruitment agency…

Another has been unfortunately highlighted by a few rotten apples. Paying less than minimum wage in New Zealand is illegal, but there are companies that do. Some of them are small employers in labour intensive industries such as fruit picking, whilst others are fairly large companies.

National and A.C.T. in their ideological determination to remove all barriers – reasonable or not – to a deregulated market – would try to undermine not only the employees who work for these companies, but potentially the companies themselves. The company boards would most likely look to cut costs, and would struggle to appreciate the argument that can be made for paying staff properly and they will in turn look after the company. The current support by small businesses being shown to Labour suggest that at least some employers have rethought how they conduct their operations, post-COVID.

Discrimination in the workplace can take many forms. Sometimes it might be based on skin colour or gender, which would immediately place the offending staff/employer in front of a potential personal grievance. Sometimes it might be based on other characteristics such as how an employee gets on with their colleagues, or how old they are. Discrimination is banned in New Zealand, but in the course of ones working life, it is probable that they will met a victim of discriminatory tactics. No individual or employer is ever going to admit such tactics, since they obviously will not want whatever punishment that the court hands down.

Not all discrimination is intentional. Employees might not be aware of the effect something they said or did has had on a person. If one brings it to their attention

A.C.T. has said it will abolish the Human Rights Commission. In proposing to abolish the H.R.C. the A.C.T. Party has basically said it has no regard for the human rights of employees in the work place. It would mean one of the main organizations that one could go to for legal redress on matters of discrimination would not be able to help any longer. National have not gone quite this far, but commentary by people such as National Members of Parliament Chris Penk and Dan Bidois suggesting that breaks be repealed, suggest National M.P.’s have a mindset that employees should not have their human dignity.

Still want to vote for either of these parties?

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